Cowboy + Hound + PhantomJS problems

I am working on setting up integration testing of our Phoenix-application using Hound. I encountered a very strange error, which is that when using PhantomJS as Hound browser driver, Cowboy will reject all incoming connection with an ‘error 400’.

Searching the internet I found out that other people had a similar problem with Cowboy as well: PhantomJS does not by default seem to add a Host:-header to the requests it does, which is against the HTTP spec and rejected by Cowboy (as well as happily accepted by most other webservers).

Switching to Selenium+Firefox instead of PhantomJS and everything works fine.
So just a heads-up that this issue exists. I’m not sure how this could/should be resolved; what would be the best approach?

  • Ask the developers of PhantomJS to alter its default settings so it follows the spec.
  • Update Hound so it requests PhantomJS to set a Host:-header when connecting.
  • Update Hound so it has the possibility to add custom HTTP headers from your own code.
  • Ask the people behind Cowboy to create a way to accept requests with missing Host:-headers.
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I think it might be easier to switch to chrome. I’m not sure if there’s anyone left to develop phantomjs further at this point: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/phantomjs/9aI5d-LDuNE.

I mostly use https://github.com/GoogleChrome/puppeteer for “end-to-end” tests.

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At first I switched to Selenium + Firefox, but lo and behold, Hound crashes whenever you try to run a find_element because it cannot understand the current format that is returned by the webdriven Firefox.

The Selenium+Chrome driver still works fine, though.

@idi527 Do you use puppeteer instead of Hound, or somehow from within Hound? I’d like to keep all my tests in Elixir-land, because the existing tests are, and because most of the stuff is server-side related anyway.

Do you use puppeteer instead of Hound, or somehow from within Hound?

Yes, I got frustrated with Hound and Wallaby at the time, and just wrote these tests in js, which was surprisingly easy.