Elixir and OS400 anyone?

hardware
os400

#1

Anyone with experience with IBM Iseries OS400 and Elixir ?


#2

Unless erlang/beam supports it, you’ll be out of luck. This thread has some suggestions:
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/elixir-lang-talk/h77wh6Kbhp4


#3

Yes i know i was there before but elixir google groups is not available
anymore so i came here just to start it all again…


#4

What are the benefits of OS400? (Just curious.)


#5

the same as a ferrari. Fast but an expensive machine.

Its an IBM machine with DB2 and a lot of power.
It can be installed php, python ,etc via PASE
https://www.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/ssw_i5_54/rzalf/rzalfintro.htm

I would like to install Elixir and have also all the power of elixir on
topo of db2.

Regards
António


#6

No mate, it’s like a modern tank :wink: Heavy but fast, almost self operating beast.
As integrated environment it shines in many cases but well… IBM is doing terrible job with promotion of the platform. It’s amazing and yet, almost unknown to non enterprise class specialists. Which is a real shame.
By the way, combining it with Elixir would be glorious :smiley:


Getting things done with Elixir - tips?
#7

PASE runs AIX, and is the avenue IBM’s taking these days to add cool new features. I did a quick Google for “erlang AIX”, and the results didn’t look promising. There’s a push to add Docker support to IBM i, but IBM hasn’t committed to it.

FWIW, like “AS/400”, the term “OS/400” is long obsolete, and would be roughly equivalent to a Windows admin saying she runs Windows NT servers.


#8

Old habits… its more popular the term OS400 than Iseries


#9

As someone who has worked with IBM marketing, this is giving me flashbacks.

On the hardware side, I believe it went AS/400 -> iSeries -> System i -> Power Systems -> Power

On the OS side, OS/400 -> i5/OS -> IBM i

Even the iSeries branding is out of date by at least 10 years… but despite the continual rebranding, almost all users still say either iSeries or AS/400.


#10

In Greece they are known as “the four-hundreds”. Usually the term comes with dreaded connotations because their presence implies outdated banking systems running cobol, not sexy ‘fintech’ stuff