Favorite programming chair?

office
#41

Just to followup. I’ve now been in that bungee chair for 4 months and it’s still great. I recommend them to everybody now.

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#42

There are two clear advantages to the squat desk option that people seem to overlook too often:

  • no need to pay for a spacious office, as one only needs the comfiness of his lavatory
  • no time wasted going to the loo anymore.

This said, I agree with @jxm that there is no silver bullet. Even a $2000 chair won’t cut it (before reading this topic I though that $1000 would be the most expensive it could get…), as our bodies are not meant to stay in the same position for 10+ hours every day. Nowadays I use a standard desktop chair, and my back hurt a little so I got a second-hand kneeling chair to use for a while, and intend to buy an exercise ball again as last time I used one it helped a lot getting my posture straight.

I also got a plan in my head for the perfect programming space: both the screens and a tablet for the keyboard and mouse could be moved easily thanks to long articulate arms, so that one could change his position quickly and effortlessly from as low as sitting on the floor, to squatting (as I just learned that’s a thing outside of Russian ghettos), to sitting on any kind of chair, to standing (height adjustable desks only account for the 2 last options). Only the hamster wheel wouldn’t really work with that idea… too bad :stuck_out_tongue:

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#43

I use a Herman Miller Embody, and a Varidesk Pro + standing mat.

Usually 2/3-ish of my working day standing; 1/3-ish sitting.

That plus some basic strength training has eliminated back problems (at least so far, touch wood.)

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#44

I’ve been using this chair for the last three weeks after I read about it on this thread:

Amazon.com: Boss Office Products B248 Ergonomic Kneeling Stool in Black: Kitchen & Dining

Even when I have a bad knee, I’m happy to say it has been great for my lower back. I now alternate between this one, and my old chair. So, thank you :blush:

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#45

Nice!

If you do feel any discomfort on your knees (even after prolonged use) it may be that the bit you sit on is too high - lower it and see how you get on :023:

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#46

I do a combination of sit stand and my chair is a Herman Miller Sayl. Had it for a few months now and I am very very happy with it. I also have an Ikea stool for when I need a second while standing and a kneeling chair like the one @AstonJ posted at the beginning of the thread. I have had lower back and neck problems for a few years and this all chair switcheroo is helping a lot.

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#47

I have just ordered Vank V6. We will see how this will work for me :wink:

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#48

it looks pretty sick ngl let us know how it is :slight_smile:

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#49

Can you do some small review after you get it? :slight_smile:
I was wondering about this chair …
Do you need to order it directly from their’s site?

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#50

No, they do not sell directly. You need to order through the reseller. I will send contact to the ones I ordered through in the PM.

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#51

I do most my programming in a lazboy recliner :). I just can’t get comfortable at a desk.

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#52

I am thinking about this one

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#53

I cannot sit anymore. Maybe 30 min at a time. Basically I rotate between:

  • a standing desk ( Skarsta from IKEA )
  • briefly supporting myself on a stool in front of the same desk (Dalfred from IKEA)
  • squatting (in an Asian manner, deep squat, flexing hips, - not on a squatting stool) (in front of a coffee table or a couch)
  • kneeling, lotus position, laying down :roll_eyes:

The hamster wheel concept is very interesting. However, the moving (and blinking?) slots in the field of vision concern me a bit.

Thinking of a stationary bike; almost any will fit under my standing desk.

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#55

I’m also not a fan of chairs that have a hard edge, my lower legs and feet have a tendency to go numb in those cases and where it’s squeezing again the bones in my leg gets super sore. I also tend to sit with one leg cross on the chair or I sit entirely cross-legged (and I tend to change every so often) so a chair that doesn’t facilitate that would be quite painful. In addition I exceptionally hate sitting at a 90 degree angle, puts pressure on my spine that I do not at all enjoy, and I instead prefer about a 135 degree angle as it is both ‘enough’ to sit on while laying down enough for full support. I’ve yet to find a chair that I find actually comfortable for my usage but I keep looking… :frowning:

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#56

Can someone explain what just happened here ? This reply to @josevalim by @GulaLai is a lightly edited copy and paste of my own comment from Sep '18 above. Is that some sort of bot ?

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#57

@OvermindDL1, you liked a copy of my own post from months above, see my other comment :slight_smile:

Anyhow, yes, apart from both of us having the same issue with that kind of chair, I concur that the front edge is hard enought to make my thighs go numb after prolonged use, so the Aeron is a no-go if you’re sensitive to that.

However, a good feature of the Aeron re. this is the negative-incline option. When unlocked, you get an extra ~ 5° FORWARD tilt or the sitting platform itself and that makes it really comfortable when leaning a bit forward and relieves pressure. But you can’t really at the same time use this AND have back support, the geometry does not really allow for it. EDIT: Actually, I just tried it and you can, but only with the back fully locked in its most forward position.

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#58

Yep, loosk like it was a spammer - deleted :003:

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#59

Ergonomy is overrated :smile:


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