Mastering Elixir (Self-published / Packt)

A new resource, it seems…

I did not read it (yet?). Anyone?

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Packt books are hit and miss - the $10 sale is the right time to try something you are curious about - at the price of an expensive magazine.

This one is kind of interesting: Learning Functional Programming in Go

Also for pre-order: Learn Type Driven Development @yawaramin

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This is definitely an intermediate book. I’m about half way through and am learning a great deal. From my notes, here are some of the more intermediate things:

(D)ETS
Supervision Trees
Dynamic Supervisors
GenStage
Typespecs and Behaviours

And that’s in the first 5 chapters. For me, I’m going to read it through twice to digest it all well.

I’d also recommend looking at “Phoenix Web Development”, also from Packt. That’s also intermediate to advanced, covering Channels, Presence, ETS, making a chat room, and so on. A lot of good books have been arriving lately.

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It seems it is even possible to get both… in combo pack.

Anyone have a promo code for this?

None required - you just have to make an account with them.

https://www.packtpub.com/books/deal-of-the-day

We’ve discussed Packt resources before - it seems they are something like Udemy, the comments in this thread might help:

Not sure how we should classify their items tbh - maybe a single thread that lists all Packt books?

I’ve had good luck with Packt books. The 2 mentioned here, Mastering Elixir and Phoenix Web Development, are solid and thorough. The writers have enormous experience.

I’ve also gotten many data science books and js framework ones at packt, usually on sale. As with other publishers there are hits and misses. But most of the time I learn a good deal. $10 for a 400 page book? That’s a heck of a bargain, and far better than wasting thousands at some grad school where they teach basically the same thing.

As for Udemy, I’ve gotten good courses and learned a lot. I never pay more than $10, and there’s a 30 day guarantee. Both of those help.

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I picked both of them up cause they were cheap. Mastering Elixir looks really good, the phoenix one look solid as well, at least just by looking at the topics.

Hi all. I’m one of the authors of Mastering Elixir. It’s really good to know you guys are enjoying the book. We tried to write a book that would talk about the full Elixir development experience, from the creation of the project until the very end, when you deploy and monitor your application.

Hope you guys enjoy it, it was a difficult but ultimately rewarding experience.

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Does anyone knows where the ElixirDrip.Storage.Workers.QueueWorker is implemented? The module is mentionned in chapter 5, but seems to be missing.

Thanks for taking time.

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Hey guys, sorry but I just found this topic now :sweat_smile: I’m one of the authors of the book.

I’ll become more active in this forum from now on, so any questions around the book please post here :wink:

For future reference, the official repo of the book is this: https://github.com/PacktPublishing/Mastering-Elixir
Here you can have the breakdown of files per chapter.

There’s also the ElixirDrip org in GitHub, which contains the final application we build throughout the book: https://github.com/elixirdrip/ElixirDrip

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Leverage the power of Elixir programming language to solve practical problems associated with scalability, concurrency, fault tolerance, and high availability with Mastering Elixir published by Packt.

What you will learn:

  • Use Elixir tools, including IEx and Mix
  • Find out how an Elixir project is structured and how to create Umbrella applications
  • Discover the power of supervision trees, the basis for fault-tolerance
  • Create a domain-specific language (DSL) which abstracts complexity
  • Create a blazing-fast web interface for your application with Phoenix
  • Set up an automatic deployment process for the cloud
  • Monitor your application and be warned if anything unexpected happens

Authors :
André Albuquerque is a software engineer at Onfido, after working in the banking industry for seven years. He has a master’s degree from Instituto Superior Técnico in distributed systems and software engineering, and, during his banking detour, he obtained a master’s degree in economics. He is currently developing Onfido’s microservices using Elixir and Ruby, learning every day about how applications can score and scale if we apply the correct tools and sound coding practices from the get-go.

Daniel Caixinha is a software engineer at Onfido, where he is using Elixir to build resilient systems that can also handle the high growth of the business. Upon joining Onfido, he got the chance to take Elixir more seriously, which made him fall in love with functional programming in general, and Elixir in particular. Besides building Elixir applications, he is fostering the use of Elixir, being also a member of the Lisbon Elixir meetup.