Other Well-Documented Languages like Elixir?

As a beginner to both Elixir and programming, it was very helpful that I could easily find things in the Elixir docs.

Do you know of any languages that are similarly documented, or even better in a different way?

With Elixir, I was able to do find everything on a single page (ex. click on a module, see the list of functions, search for a function all in the sidebar).

I found the Ruby documentation to be similar. JS, I could always find MDN pages using Google (less ideal). With Swift, Haskell, and C(++), both finding things and parsing information (and examples, if any) were difficult.

Sorry if this is a bad question! I just really want to have that experience again with another language (or library) for a weekend or few.

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Clojure has very good docs, but have in mind that they also expect some preliminary familiarity with functional programming, and maybe a basic understanding of LISP in general. Still, their docs are usually very good.

Lua docs are also pretty good, with good reference, albeit a bit wordy and verbosive for my taste – but it helps facilitate understanding for more novice programmers which is something that must be encouraged.

Apart from Elixir, Clojure and Lua, very few languages have such excellent docs like Rust. Rust is very complex and very big but they have docs and even free books with tons of exercises so you can become a master, if you can spare the time and energy.

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Clojure has very good docs, but have in mind that they also expect some preliminary familiarity with functional programming, and maybe a basic understanding of LISP in general.

I was interested in Clojure so this is very cool to hear! I remember looking at the Reference section on Clojure.org and being confused, but now I realize I should have been looking at the API section instead.

I remember I had some trouble navigating and finding things on the Lua docs, but that was a long time ago, so I’ll check it out again.

The Rust docs on first look seem a bit intimidating, but that probably has more to do with the language being complex than with the docs.

Thank you for the insight! :smiley:

Forgot to mention.

In the family of LISP languages, Racket is extremely beginner-friendly, definitely check it out.

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Clojure. Go. Dart.

Not a language, but also contain language documentation

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I think Elm deserves to be mentioned here as well. While it is only for the front-end, it is well documented with a special focus to avoid relying on preliminary knowledge, and therefore is really nice for beginners.

https://elm-lang.org/

I think it can offer an interesting entry point to functional programming, and programming in general (not many advanced concepts to learn).

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