Real-time Phoenix (Pragprog)

Lucky for me, I’m going to be on a plane tomorrow AM, travelling for work, and I already have it on my tablet! :slight_smile:

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I’m on holiday in Croatia at the moment and just bought my copy. I should have some time to at least start it and also, how cool is mobile data and devices these days. :smiley:

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purchased… look forward to having the time to dive in:/

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Exciting stuff - please let us know what you think everyone :smiley:

I’m going to start it after I finish Programming Phoenix :003:

I bought this book with keen interest on deploy your application to production. The content is not currently available - I will be patiently waiting.

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Is the deployment applicable in deploying Phoenix in general?

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This chapter is still in progress, but I’m thinking it will be partly relevant to any Elixir application and partly specific to configuring Channels and WebSocket balancing.

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Hello and thank You for the good job. I do enjoy reading the book.

I am wondering if Channels Instrumentation could have been done with Telemetry instead of StatsD?

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Yes, I waffled on whether to teach telemetry or StatsD directly. The reason I chose StatsD is because it’s conceptually a bit simpler to grasp, and it’s highly valuable (we use it in production across all apps currently). The key is that you have a way to perform measurements and you realize that doing that from day 1 is important.

This may end up changing, since nothing is written in stone until after Beta, but I’m leaning towards keeping it as StatsD.

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Thank You for the explanation :slight_smile:

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OK, very cool book with a perfect timing for me. I already read the part currently available. So let’s wait for the next beta version. :crossed_fingers: :+1:

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I bought the beta of the book and there is a wealth of information for someone new to real-time programming and it is perfect timing TBH. Can we use this thread as a place to ask technical questions?

I’d like to learn more about secure sockets. More specifically, we have an existing JWT infrastructure(a REST API that dispenses JWT tokens) and we’d like to integrate PushEx with what we already have. I’ve run the current PushEx examples so I’m still learning. Maybe this post could be good feedback as to where you could take the book that is in progress.

Sure, feel free to!

It sounds like you have a very similar setup to what we have for our use of PushEx. We are using a Ruby app to dispense authoritative JWT tokens (our Elixir apps can generate service-service tokens, but not the ones that indicate access to our systems from a user). I went to check out our integration code and it’s very simple, so here it is: https://gist.github.com/sb8244/4e077cfb850c14d1aa2a5c36909bf08b. getToken is a function that returns a token via either local cache or an HTTP call (if cache is expired). I’m not sure why it’s re-resolving a promise, as I didn’t write that part.

@sb8244 will there be samples for doing this using a frontend framework like VueJs?

I don’t have that planned currently. I’ll keep it in the back of my mind. It could be a good blog post extension to the book’s material. I’ve used Channels with React, Angular, React-Native, and Elixir without issue. I’m assuming that Vue will be sort of similar to the React style of integration (wrap in a stateful component).

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Or better, wrap it in a functional, reusable hook :slight_smile:

lol! You’re probably right. I am not a huge fan of the hook system in React, although a lot of people like them. That’s probably just me being overly cautious of new stuff.

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